University and Chronic Illness: A Survival Guide. My Debut Non-Fiction Book!

headshot of pippa outdoors, smiling and holding letterboard sign reading 'university and chronic illness: a survival guide'

Before we go any further, I’m thrilled to finally share that my non-fiction book, University and Chronic Illness: A Survival Guide is available for purchase in paperback now. SQUEEEEE! You can grab your own copy by heading to this page!

And now we return to this post from November 2019, the day I *finally* got to share my news…

Oh guys. Where do I even start with this one?

This project has been a secret for over two years now, and it still feels incredibly alien to be talking so openly about it. But having kept it all bottled up for so long, may I utilise this opportunity and take you right back to the beginning? Here’s everything you need to know…

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Finding Accessible Work With A Chronic Illness

image taken from above of silver laptop open on white bedsheets with hands typing on keyboard, iphone laid on the left hand side

So, let’s talk about working with a chronic illness.

Since I started blogging, there’s one question I’ve consistently been asked more than any other: how I find my flexible, work from home opportunities. As a self-employed chronically ill writer, I currently split my time between consultancy and content creation in the charity sector, freelance writing and editing, blogging and social media shenanigans, running my social enterprise (Spoonie Survival Kits), and incessantly guzzling tea whilst making extensive to-do lists.

You can find out a bit more about my background here, and read more about my personal career journey so far (including employment and self-employment!) in this post.

This post first came about rather spontaneously, following preparations for a livestream where I was to discuss accessible employment and managing work with a chronic illness. It was whilst doing my prep that it hit me: although there are a fair few of us talking about our personal experiences, there isn’t really a great deal of practical support and signposting to actual resources and opportunities.

So, that’s led me here: to a blog post hastily put together before the livestream, which I’ve since returned to and have been expanding ever since. It’s no secret that there simply aren’t enough flexible opportunities out there for chronically ill people, with many employers yet to realise they’re missing out on a huge wealth of talent, but I’m working on it. And in the meantime, I hope these resources go some way in helping others to kick-start their own careers.

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