How To Book Access Theatre Tickets – Seats For Disabled Patrons

izzy and pippa sat in seats in empty theatre auditorium, facing camera and smiling

Ever since I started theatre blogging and my chronic illness-friendly reviews, I’ve had messages asking about how I book my access tickets and ensure my needs are met. It’s one of those things that I’ve been doing for so long now that it’s become second nature, so these questions really made me take a step back and think about how the process could seem to somebody new to the theatre scene.

I’d hate to think of anybody missing out simply due to not knowing where to start, so today, let’s talk about access tickets, the booking process, and what adjustments could potentially be made for disabled and chronically ill patrons…

View PostHow To Book Access Theatre Tickets – Seats For Disabled Patrons

Adaptive Skiing and Disability Snowsport with Snozone Castleford, Yorkshire [AD]

pippa in powerchair, next to wall sign reading welcome to snozone

[AD] Thanks so much to the team at Snozone Castleford for inviting me to visit and for sponsoring this post: more information all about disability snowsport can be found on their website. As always, thoughts and opinions, along with adaptive skiing fangirling, are entirely my own…

It’s safe to say that blogging and writing have presented many opportunities to push myself out of my comfort zone, and there’s no example more illustrative of this than the email in my inbox asking if I’d like to give adaptive skiing a go. As somebody who thrives in a safe, comfortable environment with a cup of tea and a packet of biscuits, I was quite surprised at how keen I found myself for this experience right from the beginning, and it’s safe to say it completely lived up to my expectations.

So, how do you get a vertically challenged, cold-averse individual with limited upper body strength to, y’know, ski? Fortunately, Snozone have this down with their Disability Snowsports programme, based in Castleford, just a stone’s throw away from where I live, and also Milton Keynes. With the aim of making snowsports as accessible and inclusive as possible, both venues boast highly qualified and skilled coaches and adaptive equipment designed to accommodate a range of different disabilities and impairments, ensuring their facilities can be enjoyed by as many people as possible.

To give you an idea of my own experiences hitting the slopes, let’s break this down. Here are five of my worrisome expectations going into the session, vs the surprising reality…

View PostAdaptive Skiing and Disability Snowsport with Snozone Castleford, Yorkshire [AD]

Aids and Equipment for Managing Fatigue [AD]

pippa sat cross legged on bed holding up sign that says 'it takes me twice as much energy to achieve half as much as my peers'

[AD] This piece is sponsored by CareCo Ltd and features affiliate links. More information can be found at the bottom of this post!

Something that comes up a lot in conversation is how I negotiate living independently whilst dealing with long-term chronic fatigue. And whilst that’s a broad topic to tackle all in one go, I thought I’d begin to answer that question by sharing some of the aids and equipment I use in day-to-day life that help me to manage my symptoms.

There are various things out there to assist with practical tasks, and technological advances are increasing by the day, but I wanted to think about how these could be applied to fatigue in particular. You’ll see from the list below that the items I use range massively: some are bigger, more costly mobility aids specifically for disability, whilst others are cheap and cheerful household products.

I’m sure that anybody reading this will already be aware that different things work for different people, and it’s all about finding what works best for you and your lifestyle. And for me, the things that work include the following…

View PostAids and Equipment for Managing Fatigue [AD]

Blue Badges and Invisible Illness – My Experiences

pippa in powerchair with back to camera, looking at colourful flowers along side of path

This piece was previously commissioned by UNITE Magazine (April 2019).

Society knows that people with invisible illnesses exist, but how much do they know about people’s experiences? If others can’t see people’s symptoms with their own eyes, how do they know that they’re there? Taking our word for it apparently isn’t enough, as has been illustrated with my own Blue Badge journey.

View PostBlue Badges and Invisible Illness – My Experiences