Accessible York – Encouraging Inclusive Tourism in North Yorkshire

pippa in power-chair, pointing to outdoor sign reading 'speed limit within this yard 15MPH' and laughing

Back in September 2013 when I moved to York for university, it’s safe to say my new friends and I fully made the most of all the city had to offer. As a non-disabled student at the time, there were no barriers holding us back from exploring the tourist attractions and thriving indie businesses that York is increasingly becoming well-known for… besides the pesky student budgets and the occasional hangover, of course.

However, part-way through my degree, chronic illness inconveniently invited itself into my life. And as I’m sure you can imagine, things have never since been the same. Whilst my health has declined over the last 5 years and I’ve become an ambulatory wheelchair user, my eyes have been well and truly opened to the unrelenting and often invisible obstacles that disabled and chronically ill people face in day-to-day life. And the tourism industry here in Yorkshire, wonderful as it is, is no exception to this.

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How To Book Access Theatre Tickets – Seats For Disabled Patrons

izzy and pippa sat in seats in empty theatre auditorium, facing camera and smiling

Ever since I started theatre blogging and my chronic illness-friendly reviews, I’ve had messages asking about how I book my access tickets and ensure my needs are met. It’s one of those things that I’ve been doing for so long now that it’s become second nature, so these questions really made me take a step back and think about how the process could seem to somebody new to the theatre scene.

I’d hate to think of anybody missing out simply due to not knowing where to start, so today, let’s talk about access tickets, the booking process, and what adjustments could potentially be made for disabled and chronically ill patrons…

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Chronically Ill Entrepreneurs: Ones To Watch in 2019

I once saw a quote reading “when you buy from a small business, an actual person does a little happy dance”, and it really stuck with me. I absolutely love the sentiment of supporting independent creators, all the more so when I know they’re affected by long-term illness too. Employment and disability don’t always go hand in hand, something I’ve discussed many a time, and as I’m sure any of the following people will agree, it’s no small feat trying to earn a living when dealing with your health is a full-time job in itself.

Below is a super quick post that’s been sitting in my drafts for far too long, where I’ve highlighted some of my favourite chronically ill entrepreneurs and their businesses. I’m sure there are dozens more I could mention too, but the following are all organisations I’ve purchased from myself in the past and cannot speak highly enough of. And if you have some favourites of your own, do tell! I’d absolutely love to hear them in the comments below.

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7 Things All Chronically Ill Dancers Can Relate To

pippa at photoshoot in black ballet wear and pointe shoes with heavy make-up, sat on a counter and looking at camera taking a photo out of the shot

Since being diagnosed with my long-term condition, I’ve realised that there’s a huge correlation between professional dance and chronic illness. For me, it was ballet. I trained intensively all throughout my childhood and early teens and was lucky to enjoy some ultimate highs and accomplishments, until (in a nutshell) my underlying condition relapsed at the age of 19 and I finally discovered the diagnosis that changed my life forever. You can read more about my story here.

View Post7 Things All Chronically Ill Dancers Can Relate To