For The ‘In-Betweeners’: The Invisible Challenges Of Moderate Chronic Illness

two images of pippa. left image features pippa in pyjamas, holding soft toy, with nose cannula and headgear, right image featuring nice dress and hair and make-up done for going out

I vividly remember writing this piece on a difficult afternoon where things felt, as they so often do, rather hopeless. At the time I decided there wouldn’t be any value in putting this out into the world, especially with this post being rather more sombre than my usual writing. However, after discussing the topic with friends and seeking their feedback, it feels like the right time to finally share these musings. So today, let’s talk about the invisible challenges of being an ‘in-betweener’, moderately affected by chronic illness…

Update/ Disclaimer: ever since I first published this piece, I’ve been rather bombarded with emails offering advice and opinions on the issues discussed below. Whilst I recognise that many of these messages have come from a kind-hearted place, I wanted to reiterate that in any of my work, unless stated otherwise, I am not seeking advice or assistance of any kind. Please keep reading until the end of the post, where I discuss the ways I’m dealing with some of these issues; many of the suggestions people have been quick to point out have already been mentioned in this very piece. I appreciate you reaching out, and I don’t want to seem dismissive or ungrateful, but the very best thing you can do for me is saving the valuable time and energy you’ve used in reaching out, for yourself. Thank you for your understanding!

Before we go anywhere with this post, it’s important to make clear that I recognise my privilege. I live in a country with a healthcare system free at the point of us, I have supportive family and friends, I experienced a good education and have a regular-ish income. Although I’m chronically ill, my condition could affect me much, much more severely than it currently does. I can and do count my blessings on a daily basis, and I mean that sincerely.

Today, however, I’d like to talk about the difficulties of my current situation and in doing so, I hope you’ll keep an open mind. Chronic illness can so quickly turn into the ‘who has it worse’ game, particularly online, and I hope that my own little corner of the internet can steer clear of these shenanigans. Please do keep reading until the end and hear me out, because I have no doubt that I’m not alone with this one.

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Saving Money on Theatre Tickets as a Disabled Young Adult [AD]

 

pippa in formal wear sat in wheelchair holding olivier awards be inspired plaque

This post and associated social media posts are kindly sponsored by Triple 7 Events. Find out more about them and book some bargains on their website here [AD].

Let’s be honest: being a theatregoer certainly isn’t the most affordable hobby in the world, particularly as a disabled young person. Whilst there ARE affordable shows and tickets out there these days (which quite frankly is a blessing), we mustn’t skirt around the fact that the stagey life can leave you rather out of pocket.

Whilst I’m no Martin Lewis Money Saving Expert, over time I’ve discovered a few tips and tricks that help make my savings go further. I should probably point out that I’m putting my blogging/reviewing shenanigans aside here, where I receive complementary press tickets in return for reviews: only the shows I choose to spend my own hard-earned cash on. Here’s four of my best tips for finding affordable theatre tickets to help you get started…

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