Aids and Equipment for Managing Fatigue [AD]

pippa sat cross legged on bed holding up sign that says 'it takes me twice as much energy to achieve half as much as my peers'

[AD] This piece is sponsored by CareCo Ltd and features affiliate links. More information can be found at the bottom of this post!

Something that comes up a lot in conversation is how I negotiate living independently whilst dealing with long-term chronic fatigue. And whilst that’s a broad topic to tackle all in one go, I thought I’d begin to answer that question by sharing some of the aids and equipment I use in day-to-day life that help me to manage my symptoms.

There are various things out there to assist with practical tasks, and technological advances are increasing by the day, but I wanted to think about how these could be applied to fatigue in particular. You’ll see from the list below that the items I use range massively: some are bigger, more costly mobility aids specifically for disability, whilst others are cheap and cheerful household products.

I’m sure that anybody reading this will already be aware that different things work for different people, and it’s all about finding what works best for you and your lifestyle. And for me, the things that work include the following…

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Blue Badges and Invisible Illness – My Experiences

pippa in powerchair with back to camera, looking at colourful flowers along side of path

This piece was previously commissioned by UNITE Magazine (April 2019).

Society knows that people with invisible illnesses exist, but how much do they know about people’s experiences? If others can’t see people’s symptoms with their own eyes, how do they know that they’re there? Taking our word for it apparently isn’t enough, as has been illustrated with my own Blue Badge journey.

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18 Things I Learned In 2018

full length image of pippa in pink formal dress stood on red carpet in front of olivier awards photo board

Although I’m not a particularly superstitious person, there’s always been something about the number 18 in my family. It’s when all the birthdays and anniversaries and life events seem to fall, it’s the addresses we live at, and it always seems to be an intrinsically lucky number. And even though I’m the kind of person who’d usually laugh that off and declare it all as chance, I did wonder whether 2018 would be a significant year for me… and given the frequency of unexpected life changing things that happened this year, it’s safe to say I wasn’t disappointed.

If you’ve followed me for a while you may also know that social media at this time of year frustrates me a lot and I tend to switch off for a few days, but I couldn’t let this year go without acknowledging or marking it in some way. But rather than list all that’s happened, let me share with you 18 Things I Learned In 2018 instead…

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Disney Made Me Question My Disability

pippa and izzy stood either side of and posing with mickey mouse

This piece was originally written for Scope’s online community, but I never got around to sharing it on my blog. It was this time last year that we were in Disneyland Paris living our very best lives, so here’s something of a throwback…

Something I often consider is at what point an invisible illness becomes visible ‘enough’. Why? Because despite using an extremely visible mobility aid, many non-disabled people are still inclined to question whether I actually look unwell enough to use a wheelchair. I’ve talked many a time about people’s perceptions of my invisible condition, and what it’s like to be an invisibly ill wheelchair user, however it was my recent experience at Disneyland Paris, using their access card system for the first time, that was a particular eye-opener for me.

View PostDisney Made Me Question My Disability