Working with ME/CFS – Examples of Workplace Adjustments

pippa sat on bed, wearing comfy clothes, with laptop propped up on her crossed legs. pippa has long brown hair down and is smiling

Before we jump into this post, it feels really important to emphasise that by no means is everybody with ME/CFS is well enough to pursue employment, nor should they be expected to. I also know first-hand just how difficult it can be to find accessible employment opportunities in the first place.

However, as one of the self-named in-betweeners living with the challenges of a debilitating chronic illness whilst trying to lead an independent and fulfilling life, I think it’s important that we share as much information on this topic as we possibly can. For a bit of background, you can read more about my personal experiences with employment and becoming a chronically ill freelancer here!

If you’re new to the world of employment, or you’re returning to work after a period of ill health, you might find it helpful to know your rights as a chronically ill employee – namely, the workplace adjustments (often referred to as ‘reasonable adjustments’) you’re entitled to. In a nutshell, reasonable adjustments are modifications designed to overcome the challenges that disabled employees face. If you have ME/CFS, your employer is obligated to make reasonable adjustments under the 2010 Equality Act.

Some workplace adjustments are common and well-implemented; people know to ask for them and employers know how to accommodate them. However, with a complex condition like ME/CFS, there may well be additional changes and adaptations that could benefit your wellbeing in the workplace – and many people simply don’t know that they have a right to ask for them. In this post, I’ve listed as many of these reasonable adjustments as I can think of, in the hope that they’ll help you to think about your own unique needs and how to discuss them with your employer.

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