Aids and Equipment for Managing Fatigue [AD]

pippa sat cross legged on bed holding up sign that says 'it takes me twice as much energy to achieve half as much as my peers'

[AD] This piece is sponsored by CareCo Ltd and features affiliate links. More information can be found at the bottom of this post!

Something that comes up a lot in conversation is how I negotiate living independently whilst dealing with long-term chronic fatigue. And whilst that’s a broad topic to tackle all in one go, I thought I’d begin to answer that question by sharing some of the aids and equipment I use in day-to-day life that help me to manage my symptoms.

There are various things out there to assist with practical tasks, and technological advances are increasing by the day, but I wanted to think about how these could be applied to fatigue in particular. You’ll see from the list below that the items I use range massively: some are bigger, more costly mobility aids specifically for disability, whilst others are cheap and cheerful household products.

I’m sure that anybody reading this will already be aware that different things work for different people, and it’s all about finding what works best for you and your lifestyle. And for me, the things that work include the following…

View PostAids and Equipment for Managing Fatigue [AD]

Blue Badges and Invisible Illness – My Experiences

pippa in powerchair with back to camera, looking at colourful flowers along side of path

This piece was previously commissioned by UNITE Magazine (April 2019).

Society knows that people with invisible illnesses exist, but how much do they know about people’s experiences? If others can’t see people’s symptoms with their own eyes, how do they know that they’re there? Taking our word for it apparently isn’t enough, as has been illustrated with my own Blue Badge journey.

View PostBlue Badges and Invisible Illness – My Experiences

Standing At The Sky’s Edge (Dementia Friendly) – Sheffield Theatres

faith omole as joy, sat at table looking down into a musical box
Image Credits: Johan Persson

[Press tickets kindly #gifted in exchange for this review!]

Expectations: 4.5/5

Reality: 4/5

Chronic illness-friendly: 4/5 (Dementia Friendly Performance: keep scrolling for more info!)

pippa stood back to camera at sky edge looking oit over city visible in background

When my mum found out I would be seeing Sheffield Theatres’ Standing At The Sky’s Edge, she got me in the car and drove us to the Park Hill flats. She wanted me to see them properly for myself, and for me to stand on ‘Sky Edge’, looking out over Sheffield, just as she and her friends did when they were younger.

I had no idea that my immediate family and the generations before it had such a personal connection to the Park Hill flats, but it’s safe to say we’re not the only ones: the entire population of Sheffield knows something about them and their history. You could argue that it was only a matter of time before they became the subject of something bigger, and Sheffield Theatres did it absolutely beautifully.

View PostStanding At The Sky’s Edge (Dementia Friendly) – Sheffield Theatres

Abigail’s Party, Grand Opera House York

abigail's party press image featuring cast awkwardly sat on sofa and two people stood behind looking at each other suspiciously

Expectations: 3.5/5

Reality: 3.5/5

Chronic Illness-Friendly: 4.5/5

Having never heard of Abigail’s Party* before and deciding to see it based on the synopsis alone, I went into this show with no idea what to expect. And having come out the other side as the small cast took their bows… I still wasn’t quite sure what on Earth I’d just witnessed, but knew it was unlike any theatre experience I’d had before.

See, here’s the thing. When I use words like ‘monotonous’, ‘slow-moving’ and ‘cringe-worthy’, you’d ordinarily expect these to be negative things reflecting a sub-par performance. However, Mike Leigh’s Abigail’s Party uses these things so painfully deliberately that it was actually quite brilliant. It took me a while to warm up to this alternative performance style, and a degree of patience was required at the beginning, but when things started to shift into place in the audience’s heads, you could almost sense the entire congregation getting on board and appreciating the show all the more for it.

View PostAbigail’s Party, Grand Opera House York