Blue Badges and Invisible Illness – My Experiences

pippa in powerchair with back to camera, looking at colourful flowers along side of path

This piece was previously commissioned by UNITE Magazine (April 2019).

Society knows that people with invisible illnesses exist, but how much do they know about people’s experiences? If others can’t see people’s symptoms with their own eyes, how do they know that they’re there? Taking our word for it apparently isn’t enough, as has been illustrated with my own Blue Badge journey.

View PostBlue Badges and Invisible Illness – My Experiences

Tips For Job Hunting As A Disabled Graduate

This piece was originally commissioned by Debut Insights: see the original post here!

Let’s be honest, the education system wasn’t built with disabled people in mind. That said, every year countless disabled students graduate and embark on successful careers in the industry of their choice. Nearing the completion of your studies and thinking about work can feel overwhelming. So, here are some tips to help get you started.

Make a list of reasonable adjustments

It’s tempting to go bulldozing headfirst into job applications. But before you do, take some time to really think ahead about what you need in order to thrive. Sit down with a pen and paper and a cup of tea, and think about your daily routine. Are there specific things you do or need that should be accommodated in the workplace too? Reasonable adjustments of this kind are agreed-upon commitments between an employer and employee. They are made to ensure that the environment and role is as accessible to a disabled worker as it is to a non-disabled worker.

View PostTips For Job Hunting As A Disabled Graduate

Tips for Independent Living alongside Chronic Illness [AD]

pippa sat on grey sofa holding cup of tea and smiling, with rainbow bookshelves in background

[#AD] This post is kindly sponsored by Yorkshire Water. Don’t forget you can sign up for the Priority Services Register for free and access the support you’re entitled to by visiting this page.

In May 2018 I moved into my own flat, and it’s safe to say it’s fast become my little happy place. Although I’m chronically ill, I was very fortunate to be in a position where I could live on my own if I wanted to… and I knew that doing so was the best thing for me. As with everything there are pros and cons, but I’m finishing up my 2018 knowing that I absolutely made the right choice by making the decision to live independently.

There’s no doubt in my mind that there are others out there who’d like to live this way too, but feel overwhelmed at the thought. One of the questions I’m most frequently asked by people who read my blog is how I manage independent living alongside my condition, and today I hope to share a little about beginning that process. I already have another post planned about the specific mobility aids and adjustments I use on a day-to-day basis, and so today I’m sharing five introductory tips to ease you into independent living…

View PostTips for Independent Living alongside Chronic Illness [AD]

Finding Accessible Work With A Chronic Illness

image taken from above of silver laptop open on white bedsheets with hands typing on keyboard, iphone laid on the left hand side

So, let’s talk about working with a chronic illness.

Since I started blogging, there’s one question I’ve consistently been asked more than any other: how I find my flexible, work from home opportunities. As a self-employed chronically ill writer, I currently split my time between consultancy and content creation in the charity sector, freelance writing and editing, blogging and social media shenanigans, running my social enterprise (Spoonie Survival Kits), and incessantly guzzling tea whilst making extensive to-do lists. You can find out a bit more about my background here.

This post first came about rather spontaneously, following preparations for a livestream on Zubia where I was to discuss accessible employment and managing work with a chronic illness. It was whilst doing my prep that it hit me: although there are a fair few of us talking about our personal experiences, there isn’t really a great deal of practical support and signposting to actual resources and opportunities.

So, that’s led me here: to a blog post hastily put together before the livestream, which I’ve since returned to and have been expanding ever since. It’s no secret that there simply aren’t enough flexible opportunities out there for chronically ill people, with many employers yet to realise they’re missing out on a huge wealth of talent, but I’m working on it. And in the meantime, I hope these resources go some way in helping others to kick-start their own careers.

View PostFinding Accessible Work With A Chronic Illness